news 1 month ago

Oprah Winfrey Sets Up Billboards Outside Louisville, Kentucky for Breonna Taylor

Variety — Naman Ramachandran

After honoring Breonna Taylor by featuring her on the cover of O, The Oprah Magazine, Oprah Winfrey is now getting dozens of billboards set up around Louisville, Kentucky, demanding justice for her.

Taylor, a 26-year-old emergency room technician, was killed at the hands of police who shot her in a “no knock warrant” in her Louisville home on March 13. Her death sparked fury across the U.S. and gave rise to several demonstrations.

The billboards demand that the police involved in the killing of Taylor be arrested and charged. They feature the url for the website for Until Freedom, a social justice organization set up to address systemic and racial injustice, who have been leading protests demanding justice for Taylor.

On July 14, dozens of protesters staged a march to Kentucky attorney general Daniel Cameron’s home in Louisville. Cameron’s team is leading the Taylor investigation. Until Freedom was one of the groups behind the protests that saw 87 people arrested, including reality star Porsha Williams and NFL player Kenny Stills. The arrested are featured on Until Freedom’s website as the “Louisville 87.”

“From the beginning, our office has set out to do its job, to fully investigate the events surrounding the death of Ms. Breonna Taylor,” Cameron had said then in a statement. “We continue with a thorough and fair investigation, and today’s events will not alter our pursuit of the truth. The stated goal of today’s protest at my home was to ‘escalate.’ That is not acceptable and only serves to further division and tension within our community. Justice is not achieved by trespassing on private property, and it’s not achieved through escalation. It’s achieved by examining the facts in an impartial and unbiased manner. That is exactly what we are doing and will continue to do in this investigation.”

Celebrities who have written to Cameron demanding justice for Taylor include Beyonce.

Since the protests began, Louisville officials have banned the use of no-knock warrants.

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