Asian businesses mull tech solutions to fight modern slaverySeptember 14, 2017 12:12pm

MANILA, Philippines (AP) — Asia Pacific business leaders are working on recommendations to protect migrant workers from modern day slavery and to ensure companies' supply sources are free from such unethical employment, according to Australia's ambassador for people smuggling and human trafficking.

One idea might be to create a regional website that rates employment recruiters — something already being done in Vietnam, Andrew Goledzinowski said. Another idea could be to designate a common telephone number as a regional hotline, similar to what the sportswear company Adidas provides to its factory workers in China and elsewhere.

Goledzinowski suggested the ideas at a forum of officials and business leaders from 45 Indo-Pacific countries and territories known as the Bali Process that also aims at ensuring companies' supply of materials are not tainted by unethical employment.

Participants agreed at the meeting in Perth, Australia, to submit specific recommendations to governments next year.

"We are hoping they will come up with the recommendations for how to better manage the recruitment of migrant workers and the protection of migrant workers" he said in an interview Wednesday. He said the measures also aim "to manage supply chain transparency so that businesses are not just responsible for what happens in their business, but also who they buy from."

Migrant workers often end up dealing with recruiters they do not know, being charged high fees and having their passports taken when they reach their destination, Goledzinowski said.

"And very quickly you are trafficked, in fact, you are in debt bondage," he said, expressing hope that business leaders agree that "migrant workers should not have to pay for their own recruitment."

The recommendations will cover employment ethics, transparency standards and safeguards for victims and whistle-blowers. Some will be classed as minimum standards, and some as more ambitious targets.

"There's a lot that can be done which actually is quite easy but it only works if everyone does it," Goledzinowski said.

The Bali Process started in 2002 and includes representatives from the U.S., China, India, Japan, Afghanistan, North Korea and countries in Southeast Asia.

Page 1 of 1

More Stories Like This

Epidemic at work?: Businesses forced to deal with drug abuseOpioid epidemic, other issues lead small businesses to think about how to handle drug abuse
In this photo taken Tuesday, Sept. 19, 2017, a portion of a new offramp, center right, for Highway 99, stands completed and adjacent to the entrance for northbound traffic into the Highway 99 tunnel still being constructed in Seattle. The offramp has a new type of column that flexes when the ground shakes in an earthquake, then snaps back to its original position so that the structure not only survives a quake without collapsing but also sustains so little damage that it can be used immediately. Funded by the California Department of Transportation, scientists at a Nevada seismology lab plan to test a combination of new bridge designs on a giant ''shake table'' to see if they can better withstand big earthquakes like the one that hit Mexico on Tuesday. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)
Nevada quake lab tests new bridge design after Mexico quake
The Latest: US envoy: Alleged abuses should be investigatedA senior U.S. official says allegations of abuse during a military crackdown on Rohingya Muslims in Myanmar need to be investigated and perpetrators held accountable
FILE- In this Oct. 26, 2016, file photo, Nathan Carman, speaks to reporters outside Saint Patrick - Saint Anthony Church in Hartford, Conn., after a memorial service for his mother, Linda Carman, who was lost at sea. In a legal motion filed Monday, Sept. 18, 2017, in Rhode Island, attorneys ask a federal judge to compel Carman to provide discovery they say is relevant to the case because of “striking parallels” between Carman’s mother’s presumed death and his grandfather’s 2013 Connecticut killing. (AP Photo/David Collins, File)
Lawyers say man whose kin died is withholding information
Business ties complicate Muslim states' response to RohingyaThe muted response of the Muslim world to the exodus of Rohingya Muslims may have roots in lucrative business interests in Southeast Asia
Editorial Roundup: Excerpts from recent editorialsEditorial Roundup: Excerpts from recent editorials in newspapers in the U.S. and abroad
AdChoices

Related Searches

Related Searches

AdChoices