Red Wings denounce use of logo at white nationalist rallyAugust 12, 2017 7:05pm

The Detroit Red Wings are considering legal action to stop white nationalists from using their logo as part of a "disturbing" rally in Charlottesville, Virginia.

The team said in a statement Saturday it "vehemently" disagrees with the rally and is in no way associated with it. The logo of the NHL club could be seen on items held by people at the rally.

The Red Wings say they are "exploring every possible legal action as it pertains to the misuse of our logo in this disturbing demonstration." The team adds that it believes hockey is for everyone and celebrates the diversity of its fan base and the country.

The Red Wings said their statement would be their only comment on the matter.

NHL Deputy Commissioner Bill Daly decried the "irresponsible and improper use" of the logo.

"This specific use is particularly offensive because it runs counter to the inclusiveness that our league values and champions," Daly said in an email to The Associated Press. "We will take immediate and all necessary steps to insure the use is discontinued as promptly as possible, and will vigorously pursue other remedies, as appropriate."

There is a Michigan-based white nationalist group called the Detroit Right Wings that uses the Red Wings' logo. The group posted on its Twitter account that members had arrived in Charlottesville, the home of the University of Virginia and about 100 miles from Washington.

The university called off all sports events Saturday, including a men's soccer exhibition game against Wright State.

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