10 Things to Know for FridaySeptember 15, 2017 3:20am

Your daily look at late-breaking news, upcoming events and the stories that will be talked about Friday:

1. WHY 'DREAMERS' ARE ON EDGE

The fate of 800,000 young immigrants hangs in the balance as top lawmakers and Trump's White House argue over whether an agreement has been struck to protect them — and if so, what it is.

2. NORTH KOREA FIRES ANOTHER MISSILE

The projectile, launched from Pyongyang, flies over Japan before landing in the northern Pacific, South Korea's military says.

3. TRUMP GETS FIRSTHAND LOOK AT IRMA'S DEVASTATION

The president doles out hoagies and handshakes in the sweltering Florida heat during a tour of the storm-ravaged region.

4. WHICH CONTROVERSY PRESIDENT IS REVISITING

Trump repeats that he thinks there were "bad dudes" among the people who assembled to oppose a white nationalist protest in Virginia.

5. US CONDEMNS PERSECUTION IN MYANMAR

Secretary of State Tillerson likens the violence against the country's Rohingya Muslims to ethnic cleansing and demands it stop.

6. WHAT'S ADDING TO EQUIFAX'S TROUBLES

A software flaw that the credit agency identified could have been fixed long before the digital theft of sensitive information about 143 million Americans.

7. MOTEL CHAIN THRUST INTO IMMIGRATION DEBATE

Motel 6 says employees will no longer help federal agents following reports that staff provided guests' names to agents who arrested 20 of the people on immigration charges.

8. LONG JOURNEY AT END

After more than a decade of taking "a magnifying glass" to Saturn, NASA's Cassini spacecraft will burn up like a meteor in the sky above the enchanting planet.

9. 'I AM INCREDIBLY BLESSED'

Selena Gomez says she recently received a kidney transplant due to her struggle with lupus.

10. TEXAS, USC MEET AGAIN SATURDAY

The last time the two teams hooked up was in the Rose Bowl in 2006. Many consider it college football's greatest game.

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