The Latest: Anthony Weiner leaves court after guilty pleaMay 19, 2017 5:04pm

NEW YORK (AP) — The Latest on former congressman Anthony Weiner facing criminal charges related to sexting a 15-year-old girl (all times local):

1 p.m.

Former congressman Anthony Weiner has left a New York City courtroom after pleading guilty to exchanging sexually explicit texts with a 15-year-old girl.

The Democrat cried in court earlier Friday as he apologized for his behavior and said he had destroyed his "life's dream in public service."

He pleaded guilty to a single count of transmitting sexual material to a minor.

He agreed not to appeal any sentence between 21 and 27 months in prison. His lawyer can request leniency at a sentencing scheduled for Sept. 8.

Weiner's political career ended after his penchant for sexting strangers became public. He said his "destructive impulses brought great devastation" to his family and friends.

Weiner declined to speak to reporters as he left the courthouse.

___

11:25 a.m.

Former U.S. Rep. Anthony Weiner is crying in court as he apologizes to the 15-year-old girl with whom he exchanged sexually explicit texts.

The judge accepted Weiner's guilty plea Friday to a charge of transmitting sexual material to a minor. He agreed to not appeal any sentence between 21 and 27 months in prison.

The Democratic former congressman apologized to the 15-year-old, saying, "I have a sickness, but I do not have an excuse."

The judge told him he would have to register as a sex offender.

The FBI began investigating Weiner in September after the 15-year-old North Carolina girl told a tabloid news site that she and Weiner had exchanged lewd messages for several months. She also accused him of asking her to undress on camera.

___

11:15 a.m.

Former U.S. Rep. Anthony Weiner has pleaded guilty to transmitting sexual material to a minor and could get years in prison.

Weiner agreed Friday not to appeal any sentence between 21 and 27 months in prison.

The judge told him he would have to register as a sex offender.

The FBI began investigating the Democrat in September after a 15-year-old North Carolina girl told a tabloid news site that she and the disgraced former politician had exchanged lewd messages for several months. She also accused him of asking her to undress on camera.

The investigation of his laptop led to the discovery of a cache of emails from Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton to her aide Huma Abedin, Weiner's wife.

___

9:40 a.m.

A law enforcement official says former U.S. Rep. Anthony Weiner has agreed to plead guilty to a charge of transferring obscene material to a minor.

The former congressman is expected to enter the plea Friday.

The official wasn't authorized to speak about the plea bargain because the criminal charges had yet to be filed publicly with the court and spoke to The Associated Press on condition of anonymity.

The FBI began investigating Weiner in September after a 15-year-old North Carolina girl told a tabloid news site that she and the disgraced former politician had exchanged lewd messages for several months. She also accused him of asking her to undress on camera.

The investigation of his laptop led to the discovery of a cache of emails from Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton to her aide Huma Abedin, Weiner's wife.

— By Tom Hays

___

9:10 a.m.

Former U.S. Rep. Anthony Weiner will appear in federal court to face criminal charges in an investigation of his online communications with a teenage girl in North Carolina.

The U.S. attorney's office in Manhattan says the Democrat will appear in court at 11 a.m. Friday.

They declined to immediately release additional details about the charges against him.

The FBI began investigating Weiner in September after a 15-year-old North Carolina girl told a tabloid news site that she and the disgraced former politician had exchanged lewd messages for several months.

She also accused him of asking her to undress on camera.

The investigation of his laptop led to the discovery of a cache of emails from Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton to her aide Huma Abedin, Weiner's wife.

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