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In this Feb. 11, 2014 photo, a visitor takes photos at a burial site at Nanjing Massacre Memorial Hall in Nanjing, in eastern China's Jiangsu province.  The Tokyo shrine and the memorial hall in Nanjing, as Nanking is now called, are physical embodiments of divergent views of history that still strain China-Japan relations, 70 years after the war.  (AP Photo/Alexander F. Yuan)
Troubled history fuel Japan-China tensionJapan-China tensions point to legacy of troubled history kept alive by rival monuments
The Associated Press19 minutes ago
US justices hear arguments in Argentina debt caseUS Supreme Court to hear arguments from Argentina, creditors on access to foreign assets
The Associated Press23 minutes ago
16-year-old survives in wheel well of Maui flight'Lucky to be alive': FBI says teen stowaway unharmed in wheel well of Calif.-Hawaii flight
The Associated Press27 minutes ago
New York Mets' Curtis Granderson, right, hugs manager Terry Collins after hitting a walk-off sacrifice fly during the fourteenth inning of the baseball game at Citi Field, Sunday, April 20, 2014 in New York. The Mets defeated the Braves in extra innings 4-3. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)
Your Top Plays for TodayYour Top Plays for Today: AP's Sports Guide
The Associated Press39 minutes ago
FILE - This July 7, 2010 file photo shows Barry Diller  at the annual Allen & Co. Media summit in Sun Valley, Idaho. Thirty years after failing to persuade the Supreme Court of the threat posed by home video recordings, big media companies are back at the high court to try to rein in another technological innovation that they say threatens their financial well-being. The battle has moved out of viewers’ living rooms, where Americans once marveled at their ability to pop a cassette into a recorder and capture their favorite programs or the game they wouldn’t be home to see. Now the entertainment conglomerates that own U.S. television networks are waging a legal fight, with Supreme Court argument on Tuesday, against a start-up business that uses Internet-based technology to give subscribers the ability to watch programs anywhere they can take portable devices. The source of the companies’ worry is Aereo Inc., which takes free television signals from the airwaves and sends them over the Internet to paying subscribers in 11 cities. Aereo, backed by media billionaire Barry Diller, has plans to more than double that total. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik, File)
High court to hear dispute about TV over InternetWill Aereo fly? Broadcasters' copyright challenge to TV over Internet reaches Supreme Court
The Associated Press40 minutes ago

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